June 30, 2009
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WCO launches database of preferential agreements and related rules of origin

Photo by Samuel Zellar on Unsplash

The WCO has established a global database of preferential trade agreements and related rules of origin in accordance with the Action Plan to improve the understanding and application of preferential rules of origin endorsed by the WCO Council in June 2007.

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en, lt
EU Customs Data Model (EUCDM)
31-12-2023

The electronic customs declaration consists of data elements that should be harmonised worldwide so that customs can verify the data flow from the exporting country to the importing country. The World Customs Organisation has developed the WCO data model, which provides a universal language for cross-border data exchange. The EU has adopted this model for its own purposes and for trans-European use.

IT systems, databases
en, lt
EU Customs Data Model (EUCDM)
31-12-2023

The electronic customs declaration consists of data elements that should be harmonised worldwide so that customs can verify the data flow from the exporting country to the importing country. The World Customs Organisation has developed the WCO data model, which provides a universal language for cross-border data exchange. The EU has adopted this model for its own purposes and for trans-European use.

IT systems, databases
en, lt
UCC e-systems: Updated implementation deadlines
26-12-2023

The remaining electronic systems provided for in the Union Customs Code (UCC) will be implemented in 2024 and 2025. The introduction of a new customs system can have various implications for a company, depending on its specific activity: time savings when paper documents become electronic (e.g. T2L), significant financial savings thanks to new simplification possibilities (e.g. centralised clearance), the need to adapt company processes and software to the transition to the new systems, or simply the potential for disruption during implementation (for example, the introduction of new services of the Intelligent Customs Declaration System (iMDAS) this month in Lithuania has led to a sad joke in business community that the only Christmas wish is a working iMDAS), etc. On 15 December, the European Commission adopted a new work programme to replace the previous one. Let's take a look at the updated implementation deadlines for the systems planned for the coming years. If you work with these systems, you should think about how they will or might affect your organisation and prepare accordingly.

Enrika Naujokė

IT systems, databases
en, lt
UCC e-systems: Updated implementation deadlines
26-12-2023

The remaining electronic systems provided for in the Union Customs Code (UCC) will be implemented in 2024 and 2025. The introduction of a new customs system can have various implications for a company, depending on its specific activity: time savings when paper documents become electronic (e.g. T2L), significant financial savings thanks to new simplification possibilities (e.g. centralised clearance), the need to adapt company processes and software to the transition to the new systems, or simply the potential for disruption during implementation (for example, the introduction of new services of the Intelligent Customs Declaration System (iMDAS) this month in Lithuania has led to a sad joke in business community that the only Christmas wish is a working iMDAS), etc. On 15 December, the European Commission adopted a new work programme to replace the previous one. Let's take a look at the updated implementation deadlines for the systems planned for the coming years. If you work with these systems, you should think about how they will or might affect your organisation and prepare accordingly.

Enrika Naujokė

IT systems, databases
en
e-Certificate of Origin: the failing vision of efficiency and a possible solution
26-12-2023

The World Customs Organization has published a comprehensive study on the digitalisation of the Certificate of Origin (CO). This article provides a short summary of the existing CO issues and suggests some solutions that could help achieve the long-term digitalisation goals – such as the framework for trusted digital signatures currently used in the EU.

Dr Ramūnas Šablinskas

IT systems, databases, origin
en
e-Certificate of Origin: the failing vision of efficiency and a possible solution
26-12-2023

The World Customs Organization has published a comprehensive study on the digitalisation of the Certificate of Origin (CO). This article provides a short summary of the existing CO issues and suggests some solutions that could help achieve the long-term digitalisation goals – such as the framework for trusted digital signatures currently used in the EU.

Dr Ramūnas Šablinskas

IT systems, databases, origin
en, lt
Determination of the non-preferential origin of goods: All you need is... luck
10-12-2023

Legal clarity and certainty are what compliant companies need in order to be able to concentrate on their core activities. Legislators are trying to fulfil this need by, for example, introducing additional legislation such as binding information (BI) decisions. Frustratingly, the more legislation, the less clarity. BI decisions issued by customs authorities can be overturned by the European Commission (e.g. Harley-Davidson case), or the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU) can rule in a dispute over a BI decision that the European Commission has exceeded its powers when adopting delegated legislation, which raises the question of how binding the rules laid down in the delegated regulations, e.g. the UCC Delegated Act, are. On the latter, we provide a brief overview of a recent CJEU judgement on the rules of non-preferential origin.

Enrika Naujokė

origin
en, lt
Determination of the non-preferential origin of goods: All you need is... luck
10-12-2023

Legal clarity and certainty are what compliant companies need in order to be able to concentrate on their core activities. Legislators are trying to fulfil this need by, for example, introducing additional legislation such as binding information (BI) decisions. Frustratingly, the more legislation, the less clarity. BI decisions issued by customs authorities can be overturned by the European Commission (e.g. Harley-Davidson case), or the Court of Justice of the EU (CJEU) can rule in a dispute over a BI decision that the European Commission has exceeded its powers when adopting delegated legislation, which raises the question of how binding the rules laid down in the delegated regulations, e.g. the UCC Delegated Act, are. On the latter, we provide a brief overview of a recent CJEU judgement on the rules of non-preferential origin.

Enrika Naujokė

origin
en, lt
Thoughts on non-preferential & Deep origin
03-12-2023

The fundamental premise of these notes is that the absence of any harmonization for rules of non-preferential rules of origin is increasingly and very rapidly creating additional discriminatory opportunities to expand and extend the scope and impact of a wide range of trade policies and trade restrictions. A brief analysis will provide a few examples of this phenomena, including an examination of its probable causes, and possible approaches to mitigate related barriers to international trade. The final notes will examine potential information and data contradictions in the current efforts to control so-called 'negative externalities' by way of 'deep origin' requirements, such as forced labour and carbon measures, at the border.

Brian Staples

origin
en, lt
Thoughts on non-preferential & Deep origin
03-12-2023

The fundamental premise of these notes is that the absence of any harmonization for rules of non-preferential rules of origin is increasingly and very rapidly creating additional discriminatory opportunities to expand and extend the scope and impact of a wide range of trade policies and trade restrictions. A brief analysis will provide a few examples of this phenomena, including an examination of its probable causes, and possible approaches to mitigate related barriers to international trade. The final notes will examine potential information and data contradictions in the current efforts to control so-called 'negative externalities' by way of 'deep origin' requirements, such as forced labour and carbon measures, at the border.

Brian Staples

origin
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