October 25, 2019
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Revised Kyoto Convention

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Revised Kyoto Convention

World Customs Organisation‘s (WCO) International Convention on the simplification and harmonisation of customs procedures (Kyoto Convention) is, after amendment in 1999, known as the Revised Kyoto Convention (RKC). 

Background

The Kyoto Convention was adopted in 1973. It entered into force in 1974 and had 63 contracting parties. The EU acceded to the convention in 1974.

In June 1999, the WCO adopted the Protocol of Amendment to the International Convention on the Simplification and Harmonisation of Customs Procedures, known as the RKC. The Protocol contains Appendices I, II and III and supersedes the 1973 Kyoto Convention. The RKC entered into force on 3 February 2006. There are 112 contracting parties.

In 2003, the EU acceded to the Protocol, including Appendices I and II, by means of Council Decision 2003/231/EC.

Aim of the convention

The original 1973 convention sought to create an international instrument to simplify and harmonise its signatories’ customs procedures and thus to facilitate international trade.

The RKC amends the convention and has become the basis for effective, predictable and efficient customs procedures. It aims to contribute effectively to the development of international trade by:

  • simplifying and harmonising customs procedures and practices and fostering international co-operation;
  • combine the significant benefits of the facilitation of legitimate trade with appropriate levels of customs control;
  • improve the effectiveness and efficiency of customs administrations and, therefore, overall economic competitiveness;
  • encourage investment and the involvement of small and medium-sized enterprises in international trade;
  • stimulate economic growth by facilitating trade.

Source

The explanation is based on information in EUR-Lex

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