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en, fr
The WCO Data Model: an enabler for coordinated border management
30-06-2009

As countries developed Customs forms, requirements, and automated systems overthe years,there waslittle coordination and consultation among them. As a result, there are thousands of data elements, hundreds of different Customs forms, and as many different Customs systems as there are Customs administrations. This lack of coordination has created a confusing and confounding environment. These different requirements are rife with redundancy and duplication and are expensive to maintain and operate. Governments created this problem; governments can correctthissituation – by using the WCO Data Model.

Bill Nolle

customs inspections and controls
en, fr
The WCO Data Model: an enabler for coordinated border management
30-06-2009

As countries developed Customs forms, requirements, and automated systems overthe years,there waslittle coordination and consultation among them. As a result, there are thousands of data elements, hundreds of different Customs forms, and as many different Customs systems as there are Customs administrations. This lack of coordination has created a confusing and confounding environment. These different requirements are rife with redundancy and duplication and are expensive to maintain and operate. Governments created this problem; governments can correctthissituation – by using the WCO Data Model.

Bill Nolle

customs inspections and controls
en, fr
The WCO Data Model: a trade facilitation tool
30-06-2009

It all started when the G7 deemed standardization and a reduction in the volume of data required for international trade operations essential for facilitating the movement of goods at borders, the key elements undoubtedly being information and documentation.

David Hunt

customs inspections and controls
en, fr
The WCO Data Model: a trade facilitation tool
30-06-2009

It all started when the G7 deemed standardization and a reduction in the volume of data required for international trade operations essential for facilitating the movement of goods at borders, the key elements undoubtedly being information and documentation.

David Hunt

customs inspections and controls
en, fr
New container scanning device for Croatian Customs
31-10-2008

The use of advance technology to track the movement of cargo, and entry and exit of individuals is essential to the task of managing the movement of hundreds of millions of individuals, conveyances and vehicles. The maritime container control system will be an essential building block of the “smart border” concept.

customs inspections and controls
en, fr
New container scanning device for Croatian Customs
31-10-2008

The use of advance technology to track the movement of cargo, and entry and exit of individuals is essential to the task of managing the movement of hundreds of millions of individuals, conveyances and vehicles. The maritime container control system will be an essential building block of the “smart border” concept.

customs inspections and controls
en, fr
Study on the US 100% scanning law
31-10-2008

The WCO approached the University of Le Havre to research the impact on international trade of the recently adopted US law on 100% scanning of maritime containers before loading.

customs inspections and controls
en, fr
Study on the US 100% scanning law
31-10-2008

The WCO approached the University of Le Havre to research the impact on international trade of the recently adopted US law on 100% scanning of maritime containers before loading.

customs inspections and controls
en, fr
SAFE versus 100% scanning: Interview with Michael Schmitz
28-02-2008

One of the key standards contained in the SAFE Framework is the establishment of a risk management system to identify potentially high risk shipments. The use of non-intrusive inspection equipment is also strongly advocated, but in tandem with the application of these risk assessment techniques. At a time when the WCO is actively encouraging all its members to employ risk management, the potential implementation of 100% scanning requirements by one of the world’s major trading powers threatens to undermine the provisions of the SAFE Framework. Michael Schmitz, WCO Director of Compliance and Facilitation, responds to questions on this subject.

customs inspections and controls
en, fr
SAFE versus 100% scanning: Interview with Michael Schmitz
28-02-2008

One of the key standards contained in the SAFE Framework is the establishment of a risk management system to identify potentially high risk shipments. The use of non-intrusive inspection equipment is also strongly advocated, but in tandem with the application of these risk assessment techniques. At a time when the WCO is actively encouraging all its members to employ risk management, the potential implementation of 100% scanning requirements by one of the world’s major trading powers threatens to undermine the provisions of the SAFE Framework. Michael Schmitz, WCO Director of Compliance and Facilitation, responds to questions on this subject.

customs inspections and controls
en, fr
New United States Legal Requirements for 100% Cargo Scanning, the WCO Position
28-02-2008

In General - A container that was loaded on a vessel in a foreign port shall not enter the United States (either directly or via a foreign port) unless the container was scanned by nonintrusive imaging equipment and radiation detection equipment at a foreign port before it was loaded on a vessel.

customs inspections and controls
en, fr
New United States Legal Requirements for 100% Cargo Scanning, the WCO Position
28-02-2008

In General - A container that was loaded on a vessel in a foreign port shall not enter the United States (either directly or via a foreign port) unless the container was scanned by nonintrusive imaging equipment and radiation detection equipment at a foreign port before it was loaded on a vessel.

customs inspections and controls
en, fr
100% scanning: The European Union strategy
28-02-2008

Mr. László Kovács, the European Commission’s Taxation and Customs Union Commissioner, candidly shares his views with WCO News readers on the “Implementing Recommendations of the United States 9/11 Commission Act of 2007 which mandates 100% scanning by 2012 of sea cargo destined for the United States.

László Kovács

customs inspections and controls
en, fr
100% scanning: The European Union strategy
28-02-2008

Mr. László Kovács, the European Commission’s Taxation and Customs Union Commissioner, candidly shares his views with WCO News readers on the “Implementing Recommendations of the United States 9/11 Commission Act of 2007 which mandates 100% scanning by 2012 of sea cargo destined for the United States.

László Kovács

customs inspections and controls
en, fr
Security and Facilitation, the two scenarios
28-02-2008

The WCO and its Member administrations share with trade bodies a genuine concern to set and maintain a fair and fruitful balance between facilitation and security but they are not helped by sharp differences in the ownership of each side of the equation.

John Raven

customs inspections and controls
en, fr
Security and Facilitation, the two scenarios
28-02-2008

The WCO and its Member administrations share with trade bodies a genuine concern to set and maintain a fair and fruitful balance between facilitation and security but they are not helped by sharp differences in the ownership of each side of the equation.

John Raven

customs inspections and controls
en, fr
Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of the Harmonized System
28-02-2008

The Customs Co-operation Council (CCC) came into being at the same time as the Brussels Nomenclature and the Brussels Definition of Value (BDV), and these two Conventions formed the pillars of the Organization at its beginnings in 1952. As time went on, international trade developments gathered pace and Customs’ missions evolved. At the same time, demand for use of the Nomenclature grew not only for Customs revenue collection purposes, but also for manifold socio-economic reasons. As a result, the Brussels Nomenclature developed into the Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System (HS). This System, which entered into force in 1988, is the common language for global trade.

tariff classification of goods
en, fr
Celebrating the 20th Anniversary of the Harmonized System
28-02-2008

The Customs Co-operation Council (CCC) came into being at the same time as the Brussels Nomenclature and the Brussels Definition of Value (BDV), and these two Conventions formed the pillars of the Organization at its beginnings in 1952. As time went on, international trade developments gathered pace and Customs’ missions evolved. At the same time, demand for use of the Nomenclature grew not only for Customs revenue collection purposes, but also for manifold socio-economic reasons. As a result, the Brussels Nomenclature developed into the Harmonized Commodity Description and Coding System (HS). This System, which entered into force in 1988, is the common language for global trade.

tariff classification of goods
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